Swimming in Cold Water: A Healing Activity for Menopausal Women

Swimming in Cold Water: A Healing Activity for Menopausal Women

Swimming in cold water has been found to have significant benefits for menopausal women, according to a recent study conducted by academics at University College London. The research, which surveyed 1,114 women aged between 16 and 80, revealed that regular cold-water swimming reduced symptoms associated with menopause, such as mood swings and hot flushes.

The study participants, of which 785 women were going through menopause at the time, reported various positive effects from cold-water swimming. Half of the women stated that it significantly reduced their anxiety, while a large percentage also claimed it helped with mood swings, low mood, and hot flushes. Remarkably, over 60% of women swam specifically to address their menopausal symptoms.

These findings highlight the potential of cold-water swimming as a natural remedy for menopausal symptoms. While the study’s senior author, Prof Joyce Harper, emphasizes that the evidence is anecdotal, it suggests that this activity could alleviate physical symptoms, such as hot flushes and aches, and offer an alternative solution to women struggling with menopause.

The positive effects of cold-water swimming were even more pronounced when the women swam for longer durations and in colder water. This suggests that the intensity of the cold-water experience may correlate with the benefits obtained.

Aside from physical advantages, cold-water swimming also provided emotional and social benefits for menopausal women. Participants mentioned feelings of healing, camaraderie, shared stories, and laughter as part of the magic of swimming in cold water. It offered a sense of freedom and enabled them to momentarily escape from their menopausal symptoms.

In conclusion, cold-water swimming emerges as an activity that not only improves physical well-being but also has a positive impact on mental health for menopausal women. More research is needed to further explore the underlying mechanisms and to ascertain the long-term effects. Nonetheless, these findings may encourage more women to embrace this healing activity and discover its potential benefits for themselves.

FAQ Section:
1. What did the recent study by academics at University College London find?
– The study found that regular cold-water swimming reduced symptoms associated with menopause, such as mood swings and hot flushes.

2. How many women participated in the study?
– The study surveyed 1,114 women aged between 16 and 80.

3. Did the study participants report any positive effects from cold-water swimming?
– Yes, half of the women stated that cold-water swimming significantly reduced their anxiety, and a large percentage claimed it helped with mood swings, low mood, and hot flushes.

4. Did most women swim specifically to address their menopausal symptoms?
– Yes, over 60% of women swam specifically to address their menopausal symptoms.

5. Were the positive effects more pronounced with longer durations and colder water?
– Yes, the positive effects of cold-water swimming were even more pronounced when the women swam for longer durations and in colder water.

6. Besides physical advantages, what other benefits did cold-water swimming provide for menopausal women?
– Cold-water swimming also provided emotional and social benefits, such as feelings of healing, camaraderie, shared stories, and laughter. It offered a sense of freedom and enabled them to momentarily escape from their menopausal symptoms.

7. What does the study suggest about the potential benefits of cold-water swimming?
– The study suggests that cold-water swimming could alleviate physical symptoms of menopause and provide an alternative solution for women struggling with menopause.

Definitions:
1. Menopause: The natural process in which a woman’s menstrual cycles stop permanently, typically occurring around the age of 45-55. It marks the end of a woman’s reproductive years.

2. Mood swings: Rapid and intense changes in one’s emotional state, often characterized by irritability, sadness, or euphoria.

3. Hot flushes: Sudden feelings of heat that can cause sweating, flushing of the skin, and increased heart rate. They are a common symptom of menopause.

Suggested related links:
University College London – Official website of University College London.
Mayo Clinic – Mayo Clinic’s website provides information on menopause and its symptoms.
Healthline – Healthline offers articles on women’s health, including menopause and its management.

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