Short Yoga Sessions Combat Diabetes Risk and Maintain Wellbeing

Short Yoga Sessions Combat Diabetes Risk and Maintain Wellbeing

Researchers at Glasgow Caledonian University have discovered that incorporating brief three-minute yoga sessions into the working day can significantly lower blood glucose levels and reduce the risk of diabetes. In a study conducted by physiotherapists, including NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde team member Alex Colvin, the effects of incorporating short bouts of yoga and tai-chi into sedentary behavior were investigated. The study involved 15 healthy adults aged 26-28, and the findings revealed that short sessions of yoga were effective in reducing glucose levels and lowering the risk of diabetes without compromising concentration or wellbeing. On the other hand, tai-chi did not have the same impact on glucose levels, but it did contribute to better maintenance of concentration and wellbeing.

The research provides new insights into the benefits of breaking up prolonged sitting with physical activity that promotes mental and physical wellbeing. According to Alex Colvin, the lead author of the study, it is crucial to raise awareness about the potential of short yoga sessions to reduce the risk of diabetes while enhancing overall health. Colvin also dispelled the misconception that physical activity during work hours hampers productivity. In fact, the study demonstrated that concentration and wellbeing remained unchanged, proving that incorporating yoga or tai-chi breaks throughout the day can be beneficial for employers and employees alike.

The study involved regular glucose monitoring of the participants while following a standardized diet. Three-minute yoga and tai-chi sessions were alternated with periods of sitting to evaluate their impact on blood glucose levels. Although the study sample size was small, the significant reduction in glucose levels suggests that these short yoga sessions may be particularly beneficial for individuals who are prediabetic.

Professor Sebastien Chastin, from the University’s Research Centre for Health, highlighted the importance of the study’s findings in combating sedentary behavior. He emphasized that incorporating brief yoga sessions into the workday can effectively reduce the risk of diabetes without negatively affecting worker productivity. This research adds to the growing body of evidence supporting the health benefits of physical activity and underscores the importance of prioritizing wellbeing in work environments.

In conclusion, incorporating short yoga sessions into the daily routine has been shown to be a valuable strategy for reducing the risk of diabetes and maintaining wellbeing. These findings emphasize the need for employers to support and implement initiatives that encourage physical activity during the workday, enhancing both the health of workers and overall productivity.

An FAQ section based on the main topics and information presented in the article:

1. What did the researchers at Glasgow Caledonian University discover?
The researchers discovered that incorporating brief three-minute yoga sessions into the working day can significantly lower blood glucose levels and reduce the risk of diabetes.

2. How did the researchers conduct their study?
The study involved 15 healthy adults aged 26-28, and it investigated the effects of incorporating short bouts of yoga and tai-chi into sedentary behavior. Regular glucose monitoring was done while following a standardized diet, and the impact of three-minute yoga and tai-chi sessions on blood glucose levels was evaluated.

3. What were the findings of the study?
The findings revealed that short sessions of yoga were effective in reducing glucose levels and lowering the risk of diabetes without compromising concentration or wellbeing. On the other hand, tai-chi did not have the same impact on glucose levels, but it did contribute to better maintenance of concentration and wellbeing.

4. How does incorporating yoga or tai-chi breaks throughout the day benefit employers and employees?
Incorporating yoga or tai-chi breaks throughout the day can be beneficial for employers and employees alike. The study demonstrated that concentration and wellbeing remained unchanged, proving that incorporating these breaks does not hamper productivity. It can reduce the risk of diabetes and enhance overall health.

5. What is the role of physical activity in combating sedentary behavior?
Physical activity is essential in combating sedentary behavior. The study’s findings highlight the importance of breaking up prolonged sitting with physical activity that promotes mental and physical wellbeing.

6. Why is it important to prioritize wellbeing in work environments?
Prioritizing wellbeing in work environments is crucial because it contributes to the overall health and productivity of workers. Incorporating physical activity, such as short yoga sessions, into the workday can effectively reduce the risk of diabetes without negatively affecting worker productivity.

Definitions for key terms or jargon used within the article:

1. Sedentary behavior: Refers to activities involving sitting or lying down with low energy expenditure.

2. Glucose levels: The concentration of glucose (sugar) in the blood. High glucose levels can indicate diabetes or prediabetes.

3. Prediabetic: Refers to individuals who have higher blood glucose levels than normal but not high enough to be classified as diabetes.

4. Productivity: Refers to the measure of how efficiently and effectively work is being done, usually in relation to time and resources.

Suggested related links:

1. Glasgow Caledonian University
2. NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde
3. GCU Research Centre for Health

All Rights Reserved 2021
| .
Privacy policy
Contact