Preventing Cervical Cancer: Two Women Share Their Stories

Preventing Cervical Cancer: Two Women Share Their Stories

In 2020, Anna Ogo discovered she had cervical cancer after undergoing a routine pap smear. Having grown up in Japan, Ogo never received the HPV vaccine and was surprised to learn about the stigma surrounding HPV and cervical cancer in her home country. Similarly, Morgan Newman, who initially refused to get the HPV vaccine as a teen, was diagnosed with HPV-related cervical cancer eight years later.

Both Ogo and Newman are now sharing their stories to raise awareness about the importance of the HPV vaccine and regular cervical cancer screenings. Ogo wants everyone to understand the significance of prevention, while Newman hopes to prevent others from making the same mistake she did.

For both women, their cervical cancers were detected through pap smears. Newman experienced pain and bleeding after sex, which could have been an early sign of cervical cancer. However, she didn’t address it immediately, something many women tend to do.

Newman underwent a colposcopy, which turned out to be a painful experience for her. She was eventually diagnosed with stage 3 cervical cancer. On the other hand, Ogo had an early-stage cancer and underwent a radical hysterectomy as part of her treatment.

Both women faced different challenges throughout their treatment journeys. Newman underwent chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and internal radiation, while Ogo experienced side effects such as pain during urination and pelvic floor pain.

While Ogo is currently in remission, Newman’s cancer returned after her initial treatment, and she was diagnosed with stage 4 cervical cancer. Despite undergoing additional treatment, she has thankfully not had any recurrences since.

Cervical cancer is mainly caused by HPV infections, which are sexually transmitted. It is estimated that 50% of individuals will have had HPV after three sexual partners, and 80% of adults will have had it at some point in their lives. However, not everyone with HPV develops cancer.

The stories of Ogo and Newman emphasize the importance of regular cervical cancer screenings and receiving the HPV vaccine. By taking these preventive measures, individuals can reduce their risk and potentially avoid the devastating consequences of cervical cancer.

FAQ Section:

1. What are the main takeaways from the article?
The article highlights the importance of the HPV vaccine and regular cervical cancer screenings in preventing cervical cancer. It shares the stories of two women, Anna Ogo and Morgan Newman, who discovered their cervical cancers through pap smears. Both women now advocate for awareness and prevention.

2. What were the experiences of Anna Ogo and Morgan Newman?
Anna Ogo discovered she had cervical cancer during a routine pap smear and underwent a radical hysterectomy as treatment. Morgan Newman, who initially refused the HPV vaccine, was diagnosed with HPV-related cervical cancer eight years later. She experienced pain and bleeding after sex and was eventually diagnosed with stage 3 cervical cancer.

3. What challenges did they face during their treatment journeys?
Morgan Newman underwent chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and internal radiation. Anna Ogo experienced side effects such as pain during urination and pelvic floor pain. Newman’s cancer returned after initial treatment, and she was diagnosed with stage 4 cervical cancer, but has not had any recurrences since.

4. What causes cervical cancer?
Cervical cancer is mainly caused by HPV infections, which are sexually transmitted. It is estimated that 50% of individuals will have had HPV after three sexual partners, and 80% of adults will have had it at some point in their lives. However, not everyone with HPV develops cancer.

Definitions:
– Pap smear: A procedure to collect cells from the cervix for examination and to detect any abnormalities that may indicate cervical cancer.
– HPV: Human Papillomavirus, a sexually transmitted infection that can cause cervical cancer.

Related Links:
American Cancer Society – Cervical Cancer
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – HPV

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