Pregnant Women More Likely to Accept COVID-19 Vaccine when Receiving Other Routine Vaccines During Pregnancy

Pregnant Women More Likely to Accept COVID-19 Vaccine when Receiving Other Routine Vaccines During Pregnancy

A recent study published in the Journal of Infection has found that pregnant patients are more likely to accept the COVID-19 vaccine if they also receive other routine vaccines during pregnancy.

The study, conducted by researchers at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, analyzed data from 7,857 patients who delivered between December 2020 and March 2022. They examined the association between acceptance of tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) and influenza vaccines, which are considered routine pregnancy vaccines, and COVID-19 vaccine acceptance.

The findings revealed that 56.1 percent of patients accepted the COVID-19 vaccine. Interestingly, nearly all patients who received the COVID-19 vaccine also received the influenza and Tdap vaccines, with acceptance rates of 97.6 percent and 88.5 percent, respectively.

According to the study, patients with advanced maternal age, obesity, Asian race, and private insurance were more likely to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Furthermore, COVID-19 vaccine acceptance was associated with receiving the Tdap and influenza vaccines.

Notably, the study found no differences in adverse outcomes such as preterm birth, low birthweight, and neonatal intensive care unit admission between those who received the COVID-19 vaccine and those who did not.

These findings highlight the importance of promoting and providing routine vaccines to pregnant patients, as it can positively influence their acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine. By addressing disparities in vaccine uptake, healthcare providers can ensure equitable and widespread vaccine distribution during current and future pandemics.

Further research is needed to explore and understand the factors contributing to disparities in COVID-19 vaccination uptake among pregnant patients, ultimately guiding efforts to improve vaccine distribution and accessibility.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) based on the article:

Q: What did the study published in the Journal of Infection examine?
A: The study examined the association between acceptance of routine pregnancy vaccines (tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis and influenza) and acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine among pregnant patients.

Q: How many patients were included in the study?
A: The study analyzed data from 7,857 patients who delivered between December 2020 and March 2022.

Q: What percentage of patients accepted the COVID-19 vaccine?
A: The study found that 56.1 percent of patients accepted the COVID-19 vaccine.

Q: Did patients who received the COVID-19 vaccine also receive other routine vaccines?
A: Yes, nearly all patients who received the COVID-19 vaccine also received the influenza and tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccines.

Q: Were there any differences in adverse outcomes between those who received the COVID-19 vaccine and those who did not?
A: No, the study found no differences in adverse outcomes such as preterm birth, low birthweight, and neonatal intensive care unit admission between those who received the COVID-19 vaccine and those who did not.

Q: Which factors were associated with COVID-19 vaccine acceptance among pregnant patients?
A: The study found that patients with advanced maternal age, obesity, Asian race, and private insurance were more likely to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

Q: What is the significance of promoting and providing routine vaccines to pregnant patients?
A: The study highlights that promoting and providing routine vaccines to pregnant patients can positively influence their acceptance of the COVID-19 vaccine, ensuring equitable and widespread vaccine distribution during current and future pandemics.

Q: What is needed for further research in this area?
A: Further research is needed to explore and understand the factors contributing to disparities in COVID-19 vaccination uptake among pregnant patients, ultimately guiding efforts to improve vaccine distribution and accessibility.

Definitions:
– COVID-19 vaccine: Refers to the vaccines developed to protect against the COVID-19 virus.
– Routine pregnancy vaccines: Vaccines commonly recommended and administered during pregnancy to protect both the pregnant individual and their baby from vaccine-preventable diseases.
– Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine: A combination vaccine that protects against tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough).
– Influenza vaccine: A vaccine that protects against seasonal influenza (commonly known as the flu).
– Adverse outcomes: Unfavorable or negative outcomes, such as preterm birth, low birthweight, or neonatal intensive care unit admission, that may occur as a result of certain factors or events.

Suggested related links:
CDC: Vaccines for Pregnant Women
WHO: Vaccines for Pregnant Women

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