New Wearable Technology Developed to Manage Atrial Fibrillation

New Wearable Technology Developed to Manage Atrial Fibrillation

Researchers in Lithuania have successfully developed a groundbreaking monitoring technology to identify and manage the factors that cause atrial fibrillation. A collaboration between the Kaunas University of Technology Biomedical Engineering Institute (KTU BMEI) and Vilnius University Santaros Clinics, this new technology aims to revolutionize the way atrial fibrillation is diagnosed and treated.

Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder, affecting an estimated 33 million people worldwide. With an aging population, the prevalence of this condition is expected to double in the coming decades. Early diagnosis and treatment of atrial fibrillation are crucial, as it can lead to serious complications, including stroke. The disease usually begins with short episodes, known as “paroxysmal episodes,” which can be effectively treated if detected early.

The researchers at KTU BMEI have been working on developing atrial fibrillation monitoring technology for over a decade, and their efforts have resulted in groundbreaking solutions. A smart bracelet with an advanced algorithm capable of identifying atrial fibrillation was developed by KTU researchers several years ago. This bracelet, used in conjunction with other devices, has already shown promising results in the TriggersAF project.

The TriggersAF project focuses on identifying individual factors that provoke atrial fibrillation episodes. The scientific literature suggests that certain modifiable factors, such as alcohol consumption, physical activity, stress, and sleep disturbances, can trigger episodes of atrial fibrillation. By identifying and avoiding these factors, non-pharmaceutical interventions can be explored for effective management of arrhythmia.

The involvement of clinicians with extensive experience in dealing with atrial fibrillation was crucial for the success of the project. Justinas Bacevičius, a cardiologist at VU Santaros Clinic, was one of the key contributors to the project. With their clinical expertise, the researchers were able to ensure that the technology developed is not only innovative but also practical in a clinical setting.

The development of this wearable technology brings hope to millions of people living with atrial fibrillation. By providing a non-invasive, compact device for monitoring heart rhythm, this technology has the potential to improve the health outcomes of high-risk groups, especially older individuals. With further advancements in the field of atrial fibrillation monitoring, we can expect more effective and personalized treatments for this common heart rhythm disorder in the near future.

An FAQ section based on the main topics and information presented in the article:

Q: What did researchers in Lithuania develop?
A: Researchers in Lithuania developed a groundbreaking monitoring technology to identify and manage the factors that cause atrial fibrillation.

Q: What is atrial fibrillation?
A: Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder, affecting an estimated 33 million people worldwide. It is a condition where the heart beats irregularly or too fast.

Q: Why is early diagnosis and treatment of atrial fibrillation crucial?
A: Early diagnosis and treatment of atrial fibrillation are crucial because it can lead to serious complications, including stroke. The disease usually begins with short episodes, known as “paroxysmal episodes,” which can be effectively treated if detected early.

Q: How long have researchers been working on developing atrial fibrillation monitoring technology?
A: The researchers at Kaunas University of Technology Biomedical Engineering Institute (KTU BMEI) have been working on developing atrial fibrillation monitoring technology for over a decade.

Q: What is the TriggersAF project?
A: The TriggersAF project focuses on identifying individual factors that provoke atrial fibrillation episodes. This includes factors such as alcohol consumption, physical activity, stress, and sleep disturbances.

Q: How can non-pharmaceutical interventions be explored for effective management of arrhythmia?
A: By identifying and avoiding modifiable factors that trigger atrial fibrillation, non-pharmaceutical interventions can be explored for effective management of the condition.

Q: Who was involved in the project?
A: Clinicians with extensive experience in dealing with atrial fibrillation, including cardiologists, were involved in the project. Justinas Bacevičius, a cardiologist at Vilnius University Santaros Clinics, was one of the key contributors.

Q: How can the wearable technology developed by the researchers help individuals with atrial fibrillation?
A: The wearable technology, such as a smart bracelet, can provide a non-invasive, compact device for monitoring heart rhythm. This has the potential to improve health outcomes for high-risk groups, especially older individuals.

Definitions for key terms/jargon used in the article:

– Atrial fibrillation: The most common heart rhythm disorder characterized by irregular or too fast heart rhythms.
– Paroxysmal episodes: Short episodes of irregular heart rhythms associated with atrial fibrillation.
– Modifiable factors: Factors that can be changed or controlled, such as alcohol consumption, physical activity, stress, and sleep disturbances.
– Non-pharmaceutical interventions: Interventions or treatments that do not involve the use of drugs.

Suggested related links:
Kaunas University of Technology
Vilnius University
Vilnius University Santaros Clinics

All Rights Reserved 2021
| .
Privacy policy
Contact