Respiratory Rehabilitation Training for Children with Refractory Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Pneumonia

Respiratory Rehabilitation Training for Children with Refractory Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Pneumonia

In a recent study conducted at Wuhan Children’s Hospital, researchers investigated the effectiveness of respiratory rehabilitation training for children with refractory Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia (RMPP). The study aimed to evaluate the impact of this specialized training on various measures, including antipyretic time, disappearance time of pulmonary shadow and cough, length of hospital stay, pulmonary function, serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), and quality of life.

The study included 76 children with RMPP who were admitted to the hospital between January 2020 and February 2021. The children were randomly divided into a control group (receiving routine treatment) and a study group (receiving respiratory rehabilitation training in addition to routine treatment). The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of the hospital, and all patients’ families consented to participate.

The respiratory rehabilitation training in the study group involved specialized operation training for the healthcare staff, establishment of a fun game venue for the children, personalized training plans based on the children’s interests, and various respiratory function training exercises. The training was conducted for a duration of one month.

The researchers observed and recorded several indicators, including antipyretic time, disappearance time of pulmonary shadow and cough, length of hospital stay, pulmonary function, serum levels of IL-6, CRP, and TNF-α, and quality of life using the PedsQL questionnaire.

Statistical analysis of the data showed that the study group had significantly shorter antipyretic time, disappearance time of pulmonary shadow and cough, and length of hospital stay compared to the control group. Furthermore, the study group demonstrated improved pulmonary function and lower levels of IL-6, CRP, and TNF-α. The quality of life scores also showed improvement in all dimensions for the study group.

These findings suggest that respiratory rehabilitation training can be an effective intervention for children with refractory Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. By incorporating specialized training and personalized exercises, respiratory rehabilitation can help improve outcomes and enhance the quality of life for these children. Further research in this area is warranted to confirm these results and explore long-term effects.

Sources:
– Expert Consensus on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia in Children (2015 edition)
– SPSS 20.0 statistical software

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