Closing Toilet Lids Does Not Stop Virus Contamination, Says Study

Closing Toilet Lids Does Not Stop Virus Contamination, Says Study

New research challenges previous findings that closing toilet lids can prevent the spread of aerosolized viruses in the bathroom. Scientists from the University of Arizona and Reckitt Benckiser LLC conducted a study to investigate the impact of toilet lids on viral contamination.

In the study, the researchers used a bacteriophage to simulate human intestinal viruses and added it to both household and public toilet bowls. They then flushed the toilets with the lid either open or closed (in the case of household toilets) to measure the viral contamination on the toilet surfaces and the surrounding bathroom.

Contrary to common belief, the results showed that closing the toilet lid made no significant difference in preventing viral contamination. Whether the lid was open or closed, the amount of virus collected from the toilet or the floor surfaces was not significantly different. However, they did find that the toilet seat had the highest level of contamination, while the walls had relatively low levels.

To combat these findings, the study highlighted the importance of regular disinfection to reduce contamination and prevent the spread of viruses. Using disinfectants, such as Lysol Power Toilet Bowl Cleaner, proved highly effective in reducing viral contamination. The cleaner reduced contamination in the bowl water by over 99% when compared to no disinfectant. Additionally, the contamination of the bowl brush decreased by 98% when Lysol was used.

Senior author Charles Gerba, PhD, emphasized the significance of the study’s results for preventing pathogen transmission in healthcare settings. While closing toilet lids may not be effective, regular disinfection is crucial in reducing contamination and preventing the spread of viruses.

The study was funded by a grant from Reckitt Benckiser to the University of Arizona. These findings call for a reevaluation of current practices and emphasize the importance of proper hygiene and disinfection measures in preventing the transmission of viral particles in bathrooms.

New Research Challenges Practice of Closing Toilet Lids to Prevent Virus Spread

In a recent study conducted by scientists from the University of Arizona and Reckitt Benckiser LLC, it has been found that closing toilet lids does not significantly prevent the spread of aerosolized viruses in the bathroom. This research challenges previous beliefs on the matter.

To investigate the impact of toilet lids on viral contamination, the researchers used a bacteriophage to simulate human intestinal viruses. The bacteriophage was added to both household and public toilet bowls, and the toilets were then flushed with the lid either open or closed (in the case of household toilets). The aim was to measure the viral contamination on the toilet surfaces and the surrounding bathroom.

Contrary to common belief, the study’s findings showed that closing the toilet lid made no significant difference in preventing viral contamination. The amount of virus collected from the toilet or the floor surfaces was not significantly different whether the lid was open or closed. However, the study did find that the toilet seat had the highest level of contamination, while the walls had relatively low levels.

To combat these findings, the study emphasized the importance of regular disinfection in reducing contamination and preventing the spread of viruses. The use of disinfectants, such as Lysol Power Toilet Bowl Cleaner, was found to be highly effective in reducing viral contamination. The cleaner reduced contamination in the bowl water by over 99% when compared to no disinfectant. Additionally, the contamination of the bowl brush decreased by 98% when Lysol was used.

Senior author Charles Gerba, PhD, highlighted the significance of the study’s results for preventing pathogen transmission in healthcare settings. While closing toilet lids may not be effective, regular disinfection is crucial in reducing contamination and preventing the spread of viruses.

The study was funded by a grant from Reckitt Benckiser to the University of Arizona. These findings call for a reevaluation of current practices, highlighting the importance of proper hygiene and disinfection measures in preventing the transmission of viral particles in bathrooms.

FAQ Section:

Q1: Do toilet lids prevent the spread of aerosolized viruses?
A1: No, according to the recent study conducted by scientists from the University of Arizona and Reckitt Benckiser LLC, closing toilet lids does not significantly prevent the spread of aerosolized viruses in the bathroom.

Q2: What did the study find about viral contamination in toilet bowls?
A2: The study found that whether the toilet lid was open or closed, the amount of virus collected from the toilet or the floor surfaces was not significantly different. However, the toilet seat had the highest level of contamination, while the walls had relatively low levels.

Q3: What did the study recommend to combat viral contamination?
A3: The study recommended regular disinfection to reduce contamination and prevent the spread of viruses. Using disinfectants, such as Lysol Power Toilet Bowl Cleaner, was found to be highly effective in reducing viral contamination.

Q4: What were the findings regarding disinfection with Lysol Power Toilet Bowl Cleaner?
A4: The study found that Lysol Power Toilet Bowl Cleaner reduced contamination in the bowl water by over 99% when compared to no disinfectant. Additionally, the contamination of the bowl brush decreased by 98% when Lysol was used.

Q5: What is the significance of the study’s results for healthcare settings?
A5: The senior author of the study, Charles Gerba, PhD, emphasized the significance of the results for preventing pathogen transmission in healthcare settings. While closing toilet lids may not be effective, regular disinfection is crucial in reducing contamination and preventing the spread of viruses.

Key Terms:
– Aerosolized viruses: Viruses that are suspended in the air in the form of aerosols.
– Bacteriophage: A virus that infects bacteria.
– Contamination: The presence of harmful or unwanted substances.
– Disinfection: The process of eliminating or reducing the number of microorganisms, such as viruses or bacteria, on surfaces.
– Pathogen: A microorganism, such as a virus, bacterium, or fungus, that can cause disease.

Suggested Related Links:
Lysol Official Website
Reckitt Benckiser LLC Official Website

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